• Dwight Twilley, Pezband

    The Bell House and Trouser Press Present The Brooklyn Power Pop Festival

    Dwight Twilley

    Pezband

    1-800-BAND

    Fri, May 9, 2014

    Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

    The Bell House

    Brooklyn, New York

    $20.00 - $25.00

    Tickets Available at the Door

    This event is 18 and over

    When Power Pop and indie rock first collided in the ’70s, Trouser Press magazine was already devoted to tuneful music and the diy underground. From all corners of America, bands like Shoes, Sneakers, Pezband, Dwight Twilley, Let's Active, the Nerves and the Rubinoos didn’t need major-label endorsements to play music “where catchy hooks find the strength of blaring guitars a help, not a distraction.” Joined by Cheap Trick, Big Star, the Raspberries, Ramones, Blondie, Elvis Brothers, Velvet Crush, Go-Go’s, 20/20, Cars, Bangles, Green Pajamas, Three O’Clock and countless other great bands, Power Pop was – and is – a joyous singalong soundtrack that brings the energy. Fifty years after the Beatles lit the fuse, the timeless values that make Power Pop great continue to inspire new generations of bands, each adding their own blend of ideas and influences to the core. Come on out and play!

    Dwight Twilley
    Dwight Twilley
    Though the Dwight Twilley Band only had one hit (Twilley had another on his own), Twilley and partner Phil Seymour created an enduring and highly memorable brand of power pop that blended Beatlesque pop and Sun rockabilly "slapback" echo. Only a fraction of the band's early output was made available at the time, but these records are highly revered by power pop aficionados.

    According to the legend, Dwight Twilley met Phil Seymour in 1967 at a theater where they had gone to see the Beatles' A Hard Day's Night. After the film they immediately went to Twilley's house to start writing and recording. The two continued the partnership over the next several years, calling themselves Oister and recruiting another part-time member, Bill Pitcock IV, on lead guitar. After developing their sound in their homemade studio, "the Shop," they decided to take a stab at professional recording and headed out to Nashville, though they ended up stopping first at the legendary Sun Studios. Jerry Phillips (Sam's son) was impressed enough to team them up with former Sun artist Ray Harris, who introduced them to "the Sun sound," roughing up their Beatles-obsessed style a bit and creating a unique and endearing sound.

    Sincerely
    The two signed to Shelter Records in 1974. Their first single, "I'm on Fire," became a national hit in 1975, peaking at number 16, with relatively no promotion. During an appearance on American Bandstand, the band previewed what was to be the follow-up single, "Shark," an equally infectious, hit-worthy rocker. The success of the film Jaws caused the label to reject the single, however, to keep them from becoming perceived as a cash-in novelty act. This was just the beginning of bad luck that would plague the group from that point on. Their follow-up single and completed album went unreleased for 18 months due to label problems, and a second album recorded in England was left unreleased altogether, creating a myth around the band in some circles while the general public quickly lost interest. The belated follow-up single, "You Were So Warm," ended up failing due to distribution problems. Predictably, when the album Sincerely was finally released, it failed as well. Seymour and Twilley befriended the like-minded Tom Petty and contributed backing vocals on several tracks. Petty repaid the favor for their second album, Twilley Don't Mind, for Arista in 1977. Despite the once again unquestionably high quality of songs, the album stiffed as well. Seymour left the band the following year, pursuing a brief solo career before lymphoma cut his life short in 1993.

    Wayne's World
    Twilley carried on as a solo act, releasing Twilley for Arista in 1979 and Scuba Divers for EMI America in 1982, and found success again with Jungle in 1984, when he scored his second hit with "Girls." Wild Dogs went unnoticed on its 1986 release by CBS Associated Records. In addition, Twilley recorded an album in 1980, Blueprint, that remains unreleased and contributed one track to the 1992 Wayne's World soundtrack, "Why You Want to Break My Heart." In 1993, DCC released The Great Lost Twilley Album, which collected a fraction of the "hundreds" of unreleased songs Twilley and Seymour recorded in the early, ill-fated days. Two newly recorded songs appeared on the best-of collection XXI (The Right Stuff) in 1996, and in 1999, Twilley released both another rarities collection, Between the Cracks, Vol. 1 (Not Lame Archives), and his first new album in 13 years, Tulsa (Copper). In 2001, Twilley released The Luck (Big Oak), an album he had actually completed in 1994. The seasonal EP Have a Twilley Christmas (DMI) appeared in 2004, followed by Twilley's ninth studio album, 47 Moons, in 2005.

    Rarities, Vol. 1
    In 2007 he signed to Gigatone Records and a deluge of Twilley releases followed, including reissues of Tulsa and 47 Moons (with bonus tracks), seven volumes of Rarities discs, and a compilation of tracks recorded after Twilley left CBS, Northridge to Tulsa. In 2009 he released an album of Beatles covers titled simply The Beatles and followed it with an album of originals in 2010 titled Green Blimp. After Twilley moved to the Varèse Sarabande label, his 11th album, Soundtrack, was issued in late 2011. Chris Woodstra/AllMusic

    Dwight Twilley is back with a vengeance, touring and performing at Power Pop festivals throughout the country to fans both new and old. Be sure and check out the fantastic "lost" 45 of "Shark" recently issued on Hozac Records.
    Pezband
    Pezband
    ".... “Power-Pop” was the moment—but Pezband is forever the quintessential American rock group." Paul Broucek, President/Movie Music/Warner Brothers

    "Pezband are archetypal, unpretentious and a whole lot of fun. They offer a musical DNA that should be in the plasma of any serious music fan." Bruce Bodeen, President/Not Lame Records

    Pezband is an American Rock band formed in 1971 in the Chicago suburb of Oak Park, Illinois.

    The ensemble began in the fall of 1971 when four Oak Park musicians teamed up to jam on covers of songs by The Yardbirds, Kinks and Peter Green-era Fleetwood Mac. The original lineup consisted of Mimi Betinis (guitar and lead vocals), Mick Rain (drums and vocals), John Pazdan (guitar, piano and vocals), and Mike Gorman (bass and vocals)

    The group played its first shows at small clubs in the Chicago suburbs, then advanced to performing on Rush Street, the principle entertainment district in Chicago. Singer Cliff Johnson was added to the lineup in the Spring of 1972. Playing venues such as Rush Up, they often performed five days in a row, four to five sets a night. John Pazdan left the group in December 1972, replaced by guitarist Dan Wade. With the new lineup, Pezband started touring the American Midwest and East Coast, incorporating original songs into their sets. A year later, guitarist Tommy Gawenda replaced Wade, and the band played the West Coast as well, with shows at the legendary Whisky A Go-Go and The Starwood in Los Angeles. By the end of 1975, Johnson was replaced by singer West Davis. In 1976, the group made the decision to play as a foursome with Betinis back as lead singer. They recruited NRBQ manager Mike Lembo and were soon signed to Passport/ABC Dunhill Records, relocating to New Jersey to be closer to management and record company.

    Pezband's first record, eponymously titled ("Pezband”), was recorded in early 1977 at The House of Music in New Jersey, with E-Street sax player Clarence Clemmons, synthesist Larry Fast, and jazz trumpeter Randy Brecker making guest appearances. Positive reviews followed their first release, and the band found itself showcased as 'most promising act' at the ABC/Dunhill record convention. Soon after featured on national TV, they appeared on The Today Show with Jane Pauley, who commented that "this is the sound everybody will be talking about."

    In 1978, the group opened major stadium shows for Fleetwood Mac and Supertramp and played New York at Max's Kansas City and CBGB's. By the end of that year, the band flew to London to record their second record, "Laughing In The Dark", at Jethro Tull's studio, Maison Rouge. Guest musicians included Tommy Eyre and King Crimson sax player Mel Collins. Famed cover art designers Hypnosis produced the artwork for the album (The first Hypnosis cover design for an American band). While in London, they also cut a live EP, "Too Old Too Soon", at the club Dingwall's, the first American group to record there. As 1978 drew to a close, Rolling Stone cited the "Laughing in the Dark" LP as one of the top records of the year.

    In 1979, Pezband moved back to Chicago, recording their second live EP, "Thirty Seconds Over Schaumburg", at the suburban Chicago club B.Ginnings. Their third LP, "Cover To Cover", was recorded at Tanglewood studios in Brookfield, Illinois, at the end of the year, and included guest Scott May on keyboards.

    1980, however, saw an industry-wide slump hitting the music and record business. Indie labels like Passport were particularly affected, and their support for Pezband faded. The group briefly disbanded but reorganized in 1981 as a trio with Betinis, Rain and Pazdan. This version picked up a production deal with former Oak Parker/ Los Angeles producer Paul Broucek and in 1982 recorded an EP titled "Women & Politics" at the Record Plant in Los Angeles. But their distribution deal fell through, and the group went on hiatus in 1983.

    While on hiatus, the members took on various side projects, Betinis working with Cheap Trick bassist Tom Petersson, Pazdan founding the alt country group Big Guitars from Memphis while doing session and live work with everyone from David Sanborn to Chuck Berry. In 2006 and 2007, the trio of Betinis, Rain, and Pazdan played shows in Chicago, London, and Liverpool. They also recorded new material. Though well-received, they again disbanded...until 2012.

    Unexpectedly, in the spring of 2012, producer (and now President of Music at Warner Bros. Pictures) Paul Broucek sent the Pezband trio a mastered version of "Women & Politics", the EP they had recorded in LA in 1982. Broucek, by this time an executive and well established music producer for New Line Cinema and Warner Brothers motion pictures (including "Austin Powers" and "Lord of the Rings") had started a boutique label, Common Market. He would see to it that "Women & Politics" would finally be released. This had the effect of restarting the group, which conducted under-the-radar gigs in Chicago, appearing unannounced at small Chicago venues, variously billed as "Nozzle" and "The John Pazdan Jazz Trio".

    Drawing from a pool of five records, the "Women & Politics" EP, and new work written and recorded over the years, Pezband has formally returned. "Women & Politics" is scheduled for a 2013 release, and there will be a return tour to the UK and a first-ever tour in Japan, where fans have followed the band for decades, as well as a studio album "Dangerous People", for Japanese release. In the States, the band has started touring again, and is currently negotiating for a 7” single release in the Fall.
    1-800-BAND
    1-800-BAND
    1-800-BAND means toll free rock!

    1-800-BAND formed in the spring in anticipation of that season's warm beer days bringing back those cold pinot grigio nights. Looking to artists like the Cars, Dwight Twilley, Russ Ballard, Artful Dodger, and Tom Petty, 1-800-BAND seek to evoke the metallic slam of the Charger car door, the cry of the night hawk in a parking lot you're making out in late at night, the loose change jingling in your pocket, the tissue-thin silk of the shirt of a woman in cork heels.

    Al Huckabee (vocals, guitar), Robbie Kongress (bass), Polly Watson (keyboards), and Aaron Carroll (drums) make up the Brooklyn-based band. The band has one single, "Tropical Meds," a split with noisemongers Snakes. Spring 2012 sees the release of 1-800-BAND's eponymous full-length debut, on Slow Gold Zebra Records. 1-800-BAND was recorded at Oakland, California's Creamery Studios by Greg Ashley (the
    Dutchess and the Duke, TV Ghost, the Gris Gris). The album will be available as a limited pressing of 200 LPs.
    Venue Information:
    The Bell House
    149 7th Street
    Brooklyn, New York, 11215
    http://www.thebellhouseny.com/