Mudhoney with Pissed Jeans and The Black Clouds

The Bell House Presents:

Mudhoney with Pissed Jeans and The Black Clouds

Sunday · July 12, 2015

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$20.00 - $25.00

Sold Out

This event is 21 and over

Mudhoney
Mudhoney
Every now and then, a combination will go beyond "appropriate" or "good" and result in something that forever alters the universe. Just imagine a world without chocolate and peanut butter, Doc Martens and a leather jacket, Beavis and Butthead, and of course, Mudhoney and Sub Pop. April 2013 marks the 25th anniversary of both Mudhoney and Sub Pop Records, and there could be no better band to represent the label, past, present and future. Nirvana, Saint Etienne and Fleet Foxes are swell, but no other group has consistently kicked as much ass as Mudhoney, nor has anyone come close. Through two and a half decades, sarcastic grins remain implanted on their grizzled faces, even as empty bottles and the sneakers of a stage diver fly inches from their heads.

Along with this milestone celebration, Mudhoney have bestowed Vanishing Point upon us. It's not their first album. Or third. Or seventh. Vanishing Point is Mudhoney’s ninth studio album, a truly remarkable feat for any band, but almost statistically impossible in their case, as we are talking about a band whose 1988 debut "Touch Me I’m Sick" b/w "Sweet Young Thing Ain’t Sweet No More" was such a volatile and desperate single that it's miraculous the band made it through a weekend, let alone another year. In an age where only the newest of the new can survive (and even then, only for a few weeks at best), what could the decades-old Mudhoney have to offer? What could they possibly have left to say?

The answer is plenty. Whereas most groups originally (wrongly or otherwise) associated with the grunge movement have broken up, fallen apart, reunited as shells of their former selves or disappeared entirely (I’m looking at you, Sugartooth), Mudhoney kept on kicking out the garage-rocking, punk-infused, psycho-blues jams, ignoring the trends of the day in favor of scorching feedback, rumbling bass and the inimitable voice of Mark Arm. Vanishing Point is full of that fervor, but the band isn’t masquerading as teenaged, beer-soaked goofballs wandering high school hallways–these are songs written from the rare vantage point of a band who went through the rock ‘n’ roll meat grinder and not only lived to tell such a tale, they came out full of the wisdom and dark humor such a journey provides. Just take a listen to "I Don’t Remember You," a raucous stomper that flicks off the wannabes and hangers-on that still come around while Mudhoney attempt to buy some eggs at the store. Or take "I Like It Small," a rallying cry for the little things in life, literally–Mark Arm proudly holds GG Allin above Long Dong Silver and dingy basements over esteemed music halls, not because he should, but because it’s what Mudhoney has always favored: the dirty, the dejected, the fearless and free. They're sophisticated enough to rally against the UGG boots of wines, chardonnay, but they do so in the form of a punk rock riot song that breaks the bottle over your head before pouring it down the drain. Of course, it's not long before Mudhoney receive their comeuppance, devoured at the hands of the decadently rich cannibals that control our world in "The Final Course." Vanishing Point is filled with enough dread, psychoanalysis and Nuggets-on-fire riffs to torch your cul-de-sac.

Real uninhibited rock music is harder and harder to locate these days, but Mudhoney make it easy for you, not just by being the flagship band of the greatest record label in the history of recorded time, but by writing songs that stick in your head long after your body has been buried. Vanishing Point isn't just another entry in their impressive catalog, but the modern-day rock 'n' roll lashing we all deserve. As usual, Mark Arm says it best, as in "Sing This Song of Joy": “I sing this song of joy / for all the girls and boys / dancing on your grave…”
—Matt Korvette
Pissed Jeans
Pissed Jeans
Age and a total of four full-lengths haven't mellowed Pissed Jeans; they can still unleash a blare that will exfoliate your cochlea. Formed in Allentown, Pennsylvania, Pissed Jeans released Shallow, their first album, in 2005 on Parts Unknown Records. The band relocated to Philadelphia seven years ago, and Sub Pop released Hope for Men in 2007, and then King of Jeans in 2009. The latter was recorded by Grammy nominee Alex Newport, who also recorded their latest album, Honeys.

The process of recording four full-lengths has refined Pissed Jeans. Instead of rehashing past records or diverging in a vastly different direction their ideas and execution have become more subtly focused. The songs on Honeys are direct without being obtuse, evocative without being vague, and personal without being indulgent. They also rock like nobody's business. Do yourself a favor and forget all the claptrap you've heard about other bands delivering the goods. If you want bloodthirsty, you've got it… Sean McGuinness makes other rock drummers look like one of those dimwit longhairs with an involuntary smile playing a bongo by himself on the lawn behind a store that sells rain sticks. With a bass that sounds like a train filled with stolen shopping carts crashing into an orchestra pit, Randy Huth doesn't waste a note. Bradley Fry doesn't look like a guitar hero; he looks like a nice guy who would volunteer to help you reformat the drive on your laptop. But if he looked like he sounds he'd be wearing a necklace of human heads and even his reflection would turn you to stone. Matt Korvette screams out observations on the tedium and absurdity of adulthood, delivered in a fashion similar to the way people must sound when being waterboarded. Sometimes the band sounds like hearing yourself being bashed over the head with a snow shovel. Sometimes they sound like that feeling you'd get if you dipped your arm up to the elbow in a vat of boiling grease. Sometimes they slow down and they sound like when you wake up from a nightmare you can't quite remember. They are also catchy, not in a simpering, mewling way that your grandmother might appreciate, but in a way that would appeal to mental patients who only understand colors.

The subjects of the album Honeys are the kind of relatable, mundane, niggling things that keep you up late at night. "Bathroom Laughter" kicks off the record with ominous bass that sputters into Pissed Jeans' most stomping track yet; the song is a narrative about being on the periphery of a nasty scene. It's an oblique reminder of the glimpses we get into parts of other people's lives they try to hide. "Loubs" lays out a strut and swing under an unrequited rhapsody to a woman in high heels. In the hands of most bands this would be a moronic blurt. The Jeans turn it into an uncomfortable monologue of longing. "Health Plan" is more direct: a song about the fear of going to the doctor delivered at Black Flag velocity. The record has overtures about the misery and shackles of being a responsible adult and the shame of one's own narcissism. The music sounds like a recorded loop of a marching band being pushed down a waterslide, with added distortion. Pissed Jeans trucks in menacing songs about insecurity, and nobody has ever done it better.
The Black Clouds
The Black Clouds
The Black Clouds are an independent American rock band from central New Jersey. They are currently finishing their new record "After All". With legendary Seattle rock producer Jack Endino at the helm, "After All" was recorded at the Foo Fighters' Studio 606 in LA through the the Sound City Neve Console, then mixed and mastered at Soundhouse in Seattle.

Comprising of guitarist/vocalist Dan Matthews, guitarist Neil Hayes, bassist Gary Moses and drummer Cory King, The Black Clouds have maintained a D.I.Y. stance since their formation in late 2004. Self-produced, recorded and funded, the band’s debut LP “Wishing Well” (2008) was also mixed and mastered by Seattle’s Jack Endino. The Black Clouds played Bamboozle in 2008, and followed with a US tour in 2009 in support of "Wishing Well", which saw them hitting 25 shows in 30 days. Another tour -- again funded and booked entirely by the band -- followed in 2010, when they hit the road for SXSW and back.

The Black Clouds attack was leaner and louder with their 2012 release of their second record, “Better Days.” Once again produced, recorded, and funded entirely by the band, “Better Days” was recorded over the period of one month and mixed by yet another alternative rock legend, John Agnello. The album abides by three driving principles: Play loud. Play hard. Leave every post-modern music trend quivering in the dust, and it scores with a bullet. Better Days was followed by a completely self-funded
and booked US tour in 2014.

The Black Clouds’ grueling commitment to touring has paid off, as the band plays every live show like it’s their last one standing. And “After All” pulls off the near-impossible feat of ensnaring the band’s blood-and-spit stage fury in a way few modern bands could even strive for, let alone achieve.
Venue Information:
The Bell House
149 7th Street
Brooklyn, New York, 11215
http://www.thebellhouseny.com/